One of our contributors, Justin Coutts, maintains a group on Facebook called The Virtual Chapel. It’s an active and fun group. You might want to check it out.

Today, he posted this question to the group:

Do you believe in original sin?

Several years ago, my answer would have been quite detailed with all the theological content I could muster. Probably that’s why the original name I gave this project years ago was Contemplative Theology. Thankfully, Marc and Clint brought their energy to the project and we became Contemplative Light.

So, today, my answer was brief and perhaps a bit snarky.

Nah. I believe basic goodness is intrinsic to all of creation. However, we all share the same common struggles. In fact, there’s nothing original about sin at all. Winky emoji. LOL

Then, I did get to thinking (of course). How interesting that humanity would come up with a doctrine like original sin. You have to wonder if the ego didn’t play a hand in that round of thinking. Afterall, it does make us sound rather important, doesn’t it? To be the bearers of something so original?

And yet, there is something. Something so much greater. Something that actually does make us quite important.

For, as much as the other game ego likes to play will tend to minimize it, we do possess a great power. Peter called the divine nature (2 Peter 1:4). Paul referred to as, “Christ in you” (Colossians 1:27).

Our Christ nature, if anything, is what’s truly original about us, in every sense of the word:

  • Present or existing from the beginning; first or earliest.
  • Created directly and personally by a particular artist (God); not a copy or imitation.

Christ is our original nature.

By the way, if the Christian language doesn’t appeal, you could also call it our higher self, Buddha nature, or simply love.

And, yes, somewhere along the way, we deviated from our true nature. We fell into sin. It’s been a trend setter ever sense.

That’s why I think it’s time to stop giving sin so much power.

If we want to talk about something original, let’s talk about the goodness present from the beginning of creation. Let’s talk about that breath of life God breathed into humanity. Let’s look at this real source of power. Let’s think about what “Christ in you, the hope of glory” really means. Let’s understand how to become partakers of the divine nature we’re endowed with.

And, in the process, let’s let “original sin” be what it is – a dusty old concept from a bygone era. It just doesn’t need so much attention anymore. Why? Because if we’re going to save this poor old world, humanity needs to come into its glory before it’s too late.

So, let’s stop talking about original sin and start talking about original glory.

Who’s with me?